FOR THE LOVE OF FOOD: Your favorite foods are fake, insulin is off the hook, and the trouble with late night eating

by | Jul 22, 2016
For the Love of Food

For the Love of Food

Welcome to Friday’s For The Love of Food, Summer Tomato’s weekly link roundup. 

It’s been a long time since I’ve done any blogging here at ST. If you subscribe, you know it’s because I lost my father in early June and decided to take some time to myself this summer. I’m still not all the way back in the saddle, but I was compelled to put together some links this week. I included a few more than the usual ten links since I’ve been away for so long.

This week your favorite foods are fake, insulin is off the hook, and the trouble with late night eating.

Too busy to read them all? Try this awesome free speed reading app I just discovered to read at 300+ wpm. So neat!

I also share links on Twitter @summertomato and the Summer Tomato Facebook page. I’m very active on all these sites and would love to connect with you.

Links of the week

  • Everything we love to eat is a scam <<After eating in NYC for over a year now, this doesn’t surprise me. I’ve been shockingly underwhelmed by the food here (yes, I’ve tried your favorite places, obviously there are exceptions), and all I can point to as to why is that the food just isn’t as flavorful as it is in SF or any of my other favorite food cities (e.g. PDX, Tokyo, Copenhagen) where there is more emphasis on the source of the ingredients rather than the talent of the chefs. As described at the end of this article, once you have tasted the difference it isn’t as easy to be fooled. (NYPost)
  • NuSI-funded Study Serves Up Disappointment for the Carbohydrate-insulin Hypothesis of Obesity <<Wow. This study pretty strongly tested the ability of a low-carb, ketogenic diet to increase metabolism and it was a bust. Insulin is surely an important factor in obesity, but it doesn’t seem to be the driving force behind all the problems as many people have suggested. (Whole Health Source)
  • How the Government Supports Your Junk Food Habit <<The reason processed foods are so much cheaper than Real Food isn’t because fruits and vegetables are uniquely expensive. It’s because our tax dollars drive the cost down of processed foods via government subsidies. New research shows that eating these subsidized foods directly links to metabolic disorders. This points to a pretty obvious solution if you ask me. (NY Times)
  • Parents Should Avoid Comments on a Child’s Weight <<I can still hear the echoes of my mother and grandmother commenting on my body and eating habits from 25 years ago. As girls, we remember. (NY Times)
  • Why Exercise Actually Does Matter for Weight Loss <<Although I generally agree that “you can’t out run a bad diet,” it’s refreshing to read an actual nuanced description of the role of exercise in weight loss. (Mark’s Daily Apple)
  • To Create a Habit, Tell a Good Story <<While I disagree with Leo’s description of an ideal world where we have no personal stories, I 100% agree that changing your personal narrative is the key to lasting behavior change. (Zen Habits)
  • It’s More Important To Teach Your Kids to Cook Than to Play Soccer <<Amen. (Weighty Matters)
  • Is ‘when we eat’ as important as ‘what we eat’? <<I’m so happy to see that circadian rhythms are finally getting the attention they deserve in the weight control research. If you have a habit of staying up late watching TV and can’t figure out why the pounds won’t budge, start thinking more about what cues that habit is sending your brain. (ScienceDaily)
  • Two huge new studies further undermine the “obesity paradox” <<While I think fat shaming is deeply unhealthy for all of us as a society (and sadly this research may fuel it), I also think it’s important to be realistic about what is healthy and what isn’t. Staying as close to the healthy BMI range to the best of your ability is still optimal. (Whole Health Source)
  • Study Reveals That Eating ‘In Moderation’ Is A Fool’s Errand <<I don’t want to say I told you so, but… well….
  • chicken gyro salad <<I just returned from Greece so I’m pretty much obligated to share this recipe today. (smitten kitchen)
  • This American Life 589: Tell Me I’m Fat <<Shaming, whether public or private, is worse than just mean. Shame shrinks a person’s sense of self-worth, creating stress and a multitude of negative cognitive consequence that––contrary to the intentions of the jerk dishing it out––actually makes it even harder for the victim to achieve her goals. Obesity isn’t an issue of self-control, so it’s time to stop thinking of it as one. What we really need is more empathy for each other’s very real struggles, and I applaud NPR for this brilliant piece on fat shaming.

http://audio.thisamericanlife.org/widget/widget.min.js

 

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17 Responses to “FOR THE LOVE OF FOOD: Your favorite foods are fake, insulin is off the hook, and the trouble with late night eating”

  1. Clotilde says:

    Thought-provoking articles as ever, Darya, thank you! Now I need to go read all those tabs I just opened. ^^

  2. Aaron Dear says:

    Really good link roundup. My favorite by far was the one looking into the ketogenic diet.

    In 2013 during college, I tried shifting to this diet while continuing my 4-5 day strength training workouts. The science looked intriguing, but more importantly, I wanted to know how it felt (an overlooked part of being on a diet). And it helps that I wanted to look my best in senior year…

    Well, it was absolutely disastrous. DEXA scans before and after a monthlong period revealed that I “lost weight” – since I was on a calorie restriction, aiming for fat loss after all – but it was 80% muscle mass. The ketogenic diet ruined my hard work in the gym, ate away the muscle I worked so hard to create, and left me feeling like my brain was starved for energy (it literally might have been).

    After that experience, I remain very anti-ketogenic diet to this day. The body needs carbohydrates, period. And though I knew scientifically that those gluconeogenesis meant it had to get them from lean tissue or dietary protein, I still went through with it.

    I do a morning fast type of thing instead these days, with a macro-focused flexible eating schedule. Keeps me lean and steadily looking better and feeling better every day.

    Good links, Darya.

  3. Laurie says:

    That NYP article is the most depressing thing I’ve read today (I’ve been too busy to read the political updates today). I feel like I should just live off my meat and veggie CSA boxes and chuck the rest. But I love seafood.

    • Darya Rose says:

      Whole Foods is actually pretty good about transparency in their seafood labels. I am very careful when I eat out (and never eat at the tuna/hamachi/salmon sushi places (good places have more interesting fish), but feel pretty good about shopping at WF and cooking seafood myself.

    • Darya Rose says:

      Whole Foods is actually pretty good about transparency in their seafood labels. I am very careful when I eat out (and never eat at the tuna/hamachi/salmon sushi places––good places have more interesting fish), but feel pretty good about shopping at WF and cooking seafood myself.

  4. Leigh Schroeder says:

    Thank you so much for highlighting Tell Me I’m Fat. These perspectives are largely ignored in the fitness world and this episode of This American Life was important.

  5. Great article on a very important subject.My concern is for the boomers who are aging into ill health that is going to reduce their chances of having a productive and active life after retirement. Change for them must include their eating habits and fitness activities. Many will need to learn new cooking skills.

    Keep it coming. I have recently blogged on this at [link removed]

  6. Bethany says:

    Glad you’re back! Great stuff here, as always. Usually I’m one to comment on the content but this time I’ve actually got a suggestion re the form: rather than moving me away from your website when I click one of the links you post, please have your designers default to opening a new tab. I want summertomato to be home base, since I wanted to read so many of the articles, and I kept forgetting to specify “open link in new tab.” A minor inconvenience, but probably a quick change for your web master.

  7. Megan L says:

    Very sorry to hear about your father. Thank you for this post. Your blog is a breath of fresh air!

  8. Josh says:

    First of all, very sorry for your loss. Losing a parent can be a nightmare so my thoughts are with you as you heal.

    Thanks for all of the great links!

    Just a quick note (and not AT ALL to be an ass) related to the comment that “As girls, we remember”: As a 27 year old male who’s suffered with bulimia for 12 years, I remember the comments too. Over the past 10+ years of trying to get better, I’ve met countless other men who remember. I know 100% that it was not intentional, just reminding everyone that eating disorder/issues plague both men and women.

    Thank you again for all of your great work. As a future integrative Medicine Nurse Practitioner, I respect your work, insight, and passion!

  9. Jill says:

    I am so very sorry to hear that you lost your father. When you hadn’t posted for a while I was worried something was wrong. I too have spent much of the summer grieving. It’s great to hear from you and I’m thinking about you.

  10. Polly Owens says:

    Hope you’re well, Darya. Good to see you’re posting again 🙂

    The first food source link is highly depressing. I too wondered why Chicago’s food was underwhelming for the same reason, and what was missing. No celebration/mention of ORIGINS! I feel lucky to live in California with access to farmer’s markets. Still, the seafood industry is still so shady, everywhere. I’m going to think twice before patronizing the odd sushi joint…

  11. Polly Owens says:

    Hope you’re well, Darya. Good to see you’re posting again 🙂

    The first food source link is highly depressing. I too wondered why Chicago’s food was underwhelming for the same reason – and I suspect that’s because there was no celebration/mention of ingredient origins! (I also found good produce annoyingly difficult to find, but that’s a whole other issue..)

    I feel lucky to live in So-Cal with local access to farmer’s markets. Still, the seafood industry is so shady, everywhere. I’m going to think twice before patronizing the odd sushi joint…

  12. David Brown says:

    fabulous articles on diverse topic. Thank you Darya Rose. Hoping same great posts soon.

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